How to Write a Discursive Essay: Awesome Guide and Template

How to Write a Discursive Essay with Impact and Authority
Table of Contents

The term "discursive" comes from the Latin word "discursus," meaning to move around or traverse. A discursive essay reflects this by exploring multiple viewpoints and offering a thorough discussion on a specific topic.

In this article, our term paper writing service will define what a discursive essay is, distinguish it from an argumentative essay, provide practical tips on how to write one effectively, and examine essay examples to illustrate its structure and approach.

What Is a Discursive Essay

A discursive essay is a type of essay where you discuss a topic from various viewpoints. The goal is to provide a balanced analysis by exploring different perspectives. Your essay should present arguments on the topic, showing both sides to give a comprehensive view.

Features of discursive essays typically include:

  1. Thesis Statement: Clearly states your position or argument on the topic.
  2. Discussion of Perspectives: Examines different viewpoints or aspects of the issue.
  3. Evidence and Examples: Supports arguments with relevant evidence and examples.
  4. Counterarguments: Addresses opposing viewpoints to strengthen your position.
  5. Logical Organization: Structured to present arguments coherently and persuasively.
Source: https://essaypro.com/blog/how-to-write-a-discursive-essay

Ready to Transform Your Essays? 

From discursive writing to academic triumphs, let your words soar with our essay writing service!

Aim for the Best

How to Write a Discursive Essay

Writing a discursive essay involves examining a topic from different angles and presenting balanced viewpoints. Whether you're tackling a controversial issue or analyzing a complex subject, following these steps will help you craft a well-structured discursive essay.

discursive essay aspects

1. Understand the Topic

Before you start writing, make sure you grasp the topic thoroughly. Identify key terms and concepts to clarify what you need to discuss. Consider the different aspects and perspectives related to the topic that you will explore in your essay.

2. Research and Gather Evidence

Research is crucial for a discursive essay. Gather information from reliable sources such as books, academic journals, and reputable websites. Collect evidence that supports various viewpoints on the topic. Note down quotes, statistics, and examples that you can use to strengthen your arguments.

3. Plan Your Structure

Organize your essay effectively to ensure clarity and coherence. Start with an introduction that states your thesis or main argument. Outline the main points or perspectives you will discuss in the body paragraphs. Each paragraph should focus on a different aspect or viewpoint, supported by evidence. Consider including a paragraph that addresses counterarguments to strengthen your position.

4. Write the Introduction

Begin your essay with a compelling introduction that grabs the reader's attention. Start with a hook or an intriguing fact related to the topic. Clearly state your thesis statement, which outlines your position on the issue and previews the main points you will discuss. The introduction sets the tone for your essay and provides a roadmap for what follows.

5. Develop the Body Paragraphs

The body of your essay should present a balanced discussion of the topic. Each paragraph should focus on a different perspective or argument. Start each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that introduces the main idea. Support your points with evidence, examples, and quotes from your research. Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs to maintain the flow of your argument.

6. Conclude Effectively

Wrap up your essay with a strong conclusion that summarizes the main points and reinforces your thesis statement. Avoid introducing new information in the conclusion. Instead, reflect on the significance of your arguments and how they contribute to the broader understanding of the topic. End with a thought-provoking statement or a call to action, encouraging readers to consider the complexities of the issue.

If you find this kind of writing challenging, simply say 'write my paper', and professional writers will handle it for you.

Discursive Guide Checklist

Aspect 📝 Checklist ✅
Understanding the Topic Have I thoroughly understood the topic and its key terms?
Have I identified the different perspectives or viewpoints related to the topic?
Research and Evidence Have I conducted comprehensive research using reliable sources?
Have I gathered sufficient evidence, including quotes, statistics, and examples to support each perspective?
Structuring the Essay Have I planned a clear and logical structure for my essay?
Does my introduction include a strong thesis statement that outlines my position?
Introduction Does my introduction effectively grab the reader's attention?
Have I clearly stated my thesis statement that previews the main arguments?
Body Paragraphs Do my body paragraphs each focus on a different perspective or argument?
Have I provided evidence and examples to support each argument?
Counterarguments Have I addressed potential counterarguments to strengthen my position?
Have I acknowledged and responded to opposing viewpoints where necessary?
Conclusion Does my conclusion effectively summarize the main points discussed?
Have I reinforced my thesis statement and the significance of my arguments?
Clarity and Coherence Are my ideas presented in a clear and coherent manner?
Do my paragraphs flow logically from one to the next?
Language and Style Have I used clear and concise language throughout the essay?
Is my writing style appropriate for the academic context, avoiding overly casual language?
Editing and Proofreading Have I proofread my essay for grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors?
Have I checked the overall structure and flow of my essay for coherence?

Discursive Essay Examples

Here, let’s take a look at our samples and see how different topics are discussed from different viewpoints in real discursive essays.

Should Metaverse Educational Institutions Replace Traditional Ones?
Should Metaverse Educational Institutions Replace Traditional Ones?
Mindfulness at School
Mindfulness at School

If you found these examples helpful, you can order custom essay now and receive one on any topic you choose.

Discursive Essay Topics

Here are a range of topics that encourage exploration of different perspectives and critical analysis. Choose a topic that interests you and allows for a balanced analysis of arguments and evidence.

  1. Should governments impose higher taxes on sugary drinks to combat obesity?
  2. Is homeschooling beneficial for children's education?
  3. Should the use of drones for military purposes be restricted?
  4. Should the legal drinking age be lowered or raised?
  5. Is online education as effective as traditional classroom learning?
  6. Should parents be held legally responsible for their children's actions?
  7. Is artificial intelligence a threat to human employment?
  8. Are video games a positive or negative influence on young people?
  9. Should the voting age be lowered to 16?
  10. Should schools teach mindfulness and meditation techniques?
  11. Is cultural diversity in the workplace beneficial for companies?
  12. Should prisoners have the right to vote?
  13. Is social media addiction a real problem?
  14. Should plastic packaging be replaced with eco-friendly alternatives?
  15. Is it ethical to clone animals for agricultural purposes?
  16. Should the government provide subsidies for electric vehicles?
  17. Is privacy more important than national security?
  18. Should school uniforms be mandatory?
  19. Is renewable energy the future of our planet?
  20. Should parents have access to their children's social media accounts?

By the way, we also have a great collection of narrative essay topics to inspire your creativity.

What is the Difference Between a Discursive and Argumentative Essay

Discursive essays and argumentative essays share similarities but have distinct differences in their approach and purpose. While both essay types involve critical thinking and analysis, the main difference lies in the writer's approach to the topic and the overall goal of the essay—whether it aims to explore and discuss multiple perspectives (discursive) or to argue for a specific viewpoint (argumentative). Here’s a more detailed look at how they differ:

Key Differences 📌 Discursive Essay 📝 Argumentative Essay 🗣️
Purpose 🎯 Provides a balanced discussion on a topic Persuades the reader to agree with a specific viewpoint.
Approach 🔍 Examines multiple perspectives without taking a definitive stance Takes a clear position and argues for or against it throughout the essay.
Thesis Statement 📜 Often states a general overview or acknowledges different viewpoints. States a strong and specific thesis that outlines the writer's position clearly.
Argumentation 💬 Presents arguments from various angles to provide a comprehensive view. Presents arguments that support the writer's position and refute opposing views.

Types of Discursive Essay

Before writing a discursive essay, keep in mind that they can be categorized into different types based on their specific purposes and structures. Here are some common types of discursive essays:

purpose of discursive essay

Opinion Essays:

  • Purpose: Expressing and supporting personal opinions on a given topic.
  • Structure: The essay presents the writer's viewpoint and provides supporting evidence, examples, and arguments. It may also address counterarguments to strengthen the overall discussion.

Problem-Solution Essays:

  • Purpose: Identifying a specific problem and proposing effective solutions.
  • Structure: The essay introduces the problem, discusses its causes and effects, and presents possible solutions. It often concludes with a recommendation or call to action.

Compare and Contrast Essays:

  • Purpose: Analyzing similarities and differences between two or more perspectives, ideas, or approaches.
  • Structure: The essay outlines the key points of each perspective, highlighting similarities and differences. A balanced analysis is provided to give the reader a comprehensive understanding.

Cause and Effect Essays:

  • Purpose: Exploring the causes and effects of a particular phenomenon or issue.
  • Structure: The essay identifies the primary causes and examines their effects or vice versa. It may delve into the chain of events and their implications.

Argumentative Essays:

  • Purpose: Presenting a strong argument in favor of a specific viewpoint.
  • Structure: The essay establishes a clear thesis statement, provides evidence and reasoning to support the argument, and addresses opposing views. It aims to persuade the reader to adopt the writer's perspective.

Pro-Con Essays:

  • Purpose: Evaluating the pros and cons of a given issue.
  • Structure: The essay presents the positive aspects (pros) and negative aspects (cons) of the topic. It aims to provide a balanced assessment and may conclude with a recommendation or a summary of the most compelling points.

Exploratory Essays:

  • Purpose: Investigating and discussing a topic without necessarily advocating for a specific position.
  • Structure: The essay explores various aspects of the topic, presenting different perspectives and allowing the reader to form their own conclusions. It often reflects a process of inquiry and discovery.

These types of discursive essays offer different approaches to presenting information, and the choice of type depends on the specific goals of the essay and the preferences of the writer.

Discursive Essay Format

Writing a discursive essay needs careful planning to make sure it’s clear and flows well while presenting different viewpoints on a topic. Here’s how to structure your discursive essay:

Introduction

  • Start with an interesting opening sentence to catch the reader's attention.
    Give some background information on the topic to show why it’s important.
  • Clearly state your main argument or position on the topic, and mention that you’ll be discussing different viewpoints.

"Should genetically modified foods be more strictly regulated for consumer safety? This question sparks debates among scientists, policymakers, and consumers alike. This essay explores the different perspectives on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to give a complete view of the issues."

Body Paragraphs

  • Begin each paragraph with a sentence that introduces a key point or perspective about GMOs.
  • Present arguments, evidence, and examples to support each perspective. Consider the benefits, risks, and ethical issues around GMOs.
  • Address possible objections or opposing viewpoints to show a balanced analysis.

"Supporters of GMOs argue that genetically engineered crops can help solve global food shortages by increasing crop yields and resistance to pests. For example, studies have shown that GMOs like insect-resistant corn have reduced the need for chemical pesticides, which benefits both farmers and the environment."

Counterarguments

  • Recognize the counterarguments or concerns raised by opponents of GMOs.
  • Provide reasoned responses or rebuttals to these counterarguments, acknowledging the complexity of the issue.

"However, critics of GMOs worry about potential long-term health effects and environmental impacts. They argue that there isn’t enough research to ensure the safety of eating genetically modified foods over long periods."

Conclusion

  • Summarize the main points discussed in the essay about GMOs.
  • Reinforce your thesis statement while considering the different arguments presented.
  • Finish with a thought-provoking statement or suggest what should be considered for future research or policy decisions related to GMOs.

"In conclusion, the debate over genetically modified foods highlights the need to balance scientific innovation with public health and environmental concerns. While GMOs offer potential benefits for global food security, ongoing research and transparent regulation are essential to address uncertainties and ensure consumer safety."

Formatting Tips

  • Use clear and straightforward language throughout the essay.
  • Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs to maintain the flow of ideas.
  • Use headings and subheadings if they help organize different perspectives.
  • Properly cite sources when referencing research findings, quotes, or statistics.

Remember, besides writing compositions, you’ll also need to do math homework, something we can assist you with right away.

Yays and Nays of Writing Discourse Essays

In learning how to write a discursive essay, certain do's and don'ts serve as guiding principles throughout the writing process. By adhering to these guidelines, writers can navigate the complexities of presenting arguments, counterarguments, and nuanced analyses, ensuring the essay resonates with clarity and persuasiveness.

Yays 👍 Nays 👎
Conduct thorough research to ensure a well-informed discussion. Don’t express personal opinions in the body of the essay. Save personal commentary for the conclusion.
Explore various arguments and viewpoints on the issue. Don't introduce new information or arguments in the conclusion. This section should summarize and reflect on existing content.
Maintain a balanced and neutral tone. Present arguments objectively without personal bias. Don’t use overly emotional or subjective language. Maintain a professional and objective tone.
Structure your essay with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. Use paragraphs to organize your ideas. Ensure your arguments are supported by credible evidence. Don’t rely on personal opinions without sufficient research.
Include clear topic sentences at the beginning of each paragraph to guide the reader through your arguments. Don’t have an ambiguous or unclear thesis statement. Clearly state the purpose of your essay in the introduction.
Use credible evidence from reputable sources to support your arguments. Don’t ignore counterarguments. Address opposing viewpoints to strengthen your overall argument.
Ensure a smooth flow between paragraphs and ideas with transitional words and phrases. Don’t use overly complex language if it doesn’t add to the clarity of your arguments. Aim for clarity and simplicity.
Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different arguments and viewpoints. Don’t present ideas in a disorganized manner. Ensure a logical flow between paragraphs and ideas.
Recap key points in the conclusion, summarizing the main arguments and perspectives discussed. Don’t excessively repeat the same points. Present a variety of arguments and perspectives to keep the essay engaging.
Correct any grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors by proofreading your essay. Don’t ignore the guidelines provided for your assignment. Follow any specific instructions or requirements given by your instructor or institution.

Wrapping Up

Throughout this guide, you have acquired valuable insights into the art of crafting compelling arguments and presenting diverse perspectives. By delving into the nuances of topic selection, structuring, and incorporating evidence, you could hone your critical thinking skills and sharpen your ability to engage in informed discourse. 

This guide serves as a roadmap, offering not just a set of rules but a toolkit to empower students in their academic journey. As you embark on future writing endeavors, armed with the knowledge gained here, you can confidently navigate the challenges of constructing well-reasoned, balanced discursive essays that contribute meaningfully to academic discourse and foster a deeper understanding of complex issues. If you want to continue your academic learning journey right now, we suggest that you read about the IEEE format next.

Source: https://essaypro.com/blog/how-to-write-a-discursive-essay

Overwhelmed by Essays? 

Let professional writers be your writing wingman. No stress - just success!

Relieve the Pressure

FAQ

What is a Discursive Example?

What is the Difference Between a Discursive and Argumentative Essay?

What are the 2 Types of Discursive Writing?

Source: https://essaypro.com/blog/how-to-write-a-discursive-essay
Daniel Parker

Daniel Parker

is a seasoned educational writer focusing on scholarship guidance, research papers, and various forms of academic essays including reflective and narrative essays. His expertise also extends to detailed case studies. A scholar with a background in English Literature and Education, Daniel’s work on EssayPro blog aims to support students in achieving academic excellence and securing scholarships. His hobbies include reading classic literature and participating in academic forums.

What was changed:
  • Updated old sections including definition, outline, writing guide.
  • Added new topics, examples, checklist, FAQs.

Sources:

Select Category
All Posts